Writing I love and Writing I don’t, SOLC 2015, 22 of 31

The writing I love
is for me
is for them
is stories
and noticings
and observations

The writing I love
is easy
and fun
and well-recieved.

The writing I love
is exploratory
and risky
and crafty.

The writing I don’t love
is forced
formulaic
evaluative

The writing I don’t love
is pressured
time bound
and topic driven by someone else

Guess which writing I’ve been doing all morning? 😦

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16 Comments

  1. Lori said,

    March 22, 2015 at 3:18 pm

    Sorry! Now make time for the writing you love!

  2. bennisbuzz said,

    March 22, 2015 at 3:21 pm

    Repeated lines makes the best poems. I love yours. Do you know the book, “The Important Book,” by Margaret Wise Brown? It’s perfect for teaching children the power of the repeated line. “The important thing about….” and ends with “But the important thing about …is ….”
    Great poem about writing!
    D 🙂

  3. Terje said,

    March 22, 2015 at 3:24 pm

    Wishing you lots of time with writing you love. I like the poem structure with two opposing angles to writing.

  4. Sonja Schulz said,

    March 22, 2015 at 3:25 pm

    I find it so hard to stick to it when I am in one of those forced writing situations these days. Hope you get through it soon and can move on into more of the wonderful writing you love!

  5. mbhmaine said,

    March 22, 2015 at 3:28 pm

    Thanks for sharing your poem. Got to love risky and crafty writing! I hope you find some more time soon to dive into writing you love. This challenge has given me so much insight into my own writing. Unfortunately today must be devoted to writing I must do: report card comments. Ugh….

  6. freegriffa said,

    March 22, 2015 at 3:51 pm

    Forced evaluative writing is inauthentic, I agree it’s the worst. Nice job articulating what gives you joy in your poem!

  7. rosecappelli said,

    March 22, 2015 at 3:54 pm

    Your poem says it all! I think this challenge has helped us all find the writing we love!

  8. March 22, 2015 at 3:56 pm

    This should be a mantra we use as teachers, so that children have the agency to determine their own writing.

  9. mvervinck said,

    March 22, 2015 at 4:15 pm

    You are a true writer if you enjoy the unstructured fun of just creating. Some people really struggle with writing in this way, but I compare it to creating music. The people who are most creative when playing an instrument can improvise music where the most creative writers are able to improvise a poem. Nice!

  10. March 22, 2015 at 5:32 pm

    Writing I love….such a nice repeated line…just the way you put the word writing first, says something about how you feel about it! I know you will make time for yourself today and other days! So glad you shared this slice!!

  11. drew said,

    March 22, 2015 at 7:03 pm

    Well said, I can totally relate, espeeeeecially the last line. In terms of art, if I’m trying to draw something for someone else, if it doesn’t fail completely its a completely painful experience. That shouldn’t be a bad thing, I should use that to grow; but I don’t… I usually opt for comfort :p

  12. macrush53 said,

    March 22, 2015 at 7:18 pm

    I like your repeating lines. Thanks for reminding me about the writing I love.

  13. lynnjake said,

    March 22, 2015 at 7:46 pm

    I love this. You have really said it all. I hope you still have time for more of what you love!

  14. March 22, 2015 at 8:33 pm

    So true! You have creatively expressed your disappointment with formulaic writing.

  15. caroline524 said,

    March 23, 2015 at 2:46 am

    I enjoyed the repetitive lines. I think this is a good reminder as we teach writing to students.

  16. March 23, 2015 at 4:08 am

    Being able to articulate exactly what it is that you like about writing is crucial to knowing yourself as a writer. When writing is for authentic purposes it has genuine appeal. The words flow as they have here. Words artificially constructed or contrived generally have to be pushed onto the page. your poem shines a light on this important distinction,


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